Where to go for survival?

The most asked question I get, from those assuming I’m better informed on this subject than them, is “So where do I move to survive all this?”. I’ve been researching this (human survival) on several separate occasions the past two decades. One crucial requirement is the lack of seismic destruction, either by tsunami or by living on top of tectonic hazardous areas. So, scratching that off the list leaves the areas that will suffer the least from a warming planet. One would assume that would be the polar regions, but that’s a big mistake. Both poles are going to suffer immensely from warmer than normal surface (and ocean) temperatures. Aside from the soil being practically dead from the fast changes in temperature, there’s not much organic life that survives ice to heat in the currently observed time-spans.
I’ll elaborate more on all this as time passes, and will update this message/article, but for now I’ll post my findings thus far, the short-cut to a valuable answer to the question without the background info;

I’d advice the Heard & McDonald islands and/or the Falkland Islands. They’ll stay coldest the longest in the future, as do the seas around them, so if you’re lucky there’s still a food-source in the oceans too. The Falklands are probably going to be flooded with migrants from Argentina by then, and for that spot I’d hint at the NE-part of the islands. But the other option, somewhere around here, is my personal best bet for longest possible human survival. Be sure to build shelter somewhere on high ground on the NW part of the island, so you’ll be safe in case the Mawson Peak volcano erupts. Be sure to bring some seeds and soil to start up some new microbial freshwater life there. It all looks dead there now, but I assure you, it will be a thriving jungle there soon enough. The only hurdle hard to overcome is radio-activity from the isotopes spread by unmanned molten down nuke plants everywhere. Perhaps in a few years we’ll have a working pill against that. One can hope and dream about surviving on other planets, but the straws to hang on to for that are getting thinner by the day. As is the world’s ice, making it harder to predict our options in the near future. As I like to often put it, there are two basic premises that overrule all others;
What goes on in the Arctic doesn’t stay in the Arctic.
The flywheels we’ve set in motion are not going to be easy to bring to a standstill.

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